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Gun Control/Rights Thread (Redirected)
#71
(6 Jul 2015, 01:39:00)Emperor Markus II Wrote:
(6 Jul 2015, 01:24:43)Ned 1st President of Nedland Wrote: Mate, that gun is fake. No such gun existed in the 1700s.

Also, the recoil of that thing would make the pistol retaliate back and through your face and out the back of your head.

It is called a "Pepperbox Pistol", actually. It did exist, though I do stand corrected; it was made in the 1830s.

However, the Puckle gun, an early precursor to the Gatling gun, existed as early as 1718.

[Image: PuckleGun-1.gif]

Interesting quote from the picture:

Quote:To Defending Yourselves and Protestant Cause
At least the puckle gun is real. Though it never really worked. Which is why it is so unknown
       [Image: Personal_CoA_of_Patrick_I.png]          
H.I.M  Patrick I, Emperor of Paravia,
King of Hoppalobindia,
 King Of Demirelia,
Vorsitzender of the Abeldane Empire,
Former Emperor of Nedland,
  Former Prime minister of Alenshka,
  And former Acting Premier of DRCC
            
 For folk og Rike
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#72
A well-regulated militia at those times would have had the latest technology in weapons to defend the United States from a foreign attack from the Brits who definitely had the cutting edge technology of weapons.

Nowadays, the threat of invasion of U.S. soil is greater, and grows greater by the day in this national war between conservative Islam and the western world. Attempts to endanger the American people is a foolish endeavour.

Lowering crime rates by improving education, and actually healing the wounded economy instead of the "progress" of socialised housing and healthcare as a bandage is the best course of action for the U.S.
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Siwa Sopako Wogo Sani-Hong Kunoku
Manu ku awaso yo Tongowa Manuka hehe yoma tise.

If a post doesn't have a question mark, it isn't a question.
If it isn't a question, I'm not asking you anything, I'm telling you.
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#73
(6 Jul 2015, 02:39:42)kingjohnthefirst Wrote: Lowering crime rates by improving education, and actually healing the wounded economy instead of the "progress" of socialised housing and healthcare as a bandage is the best course of action for the U.S.

I agree that education must be improved greatly, with affordable access to higher education and possibly compulsory school attendance (where it is practicable).

As for healthcare and socialized housing being a "bandage" for the U.S. economy, I think that is a rather bad analogy. Your disapproval of establishing universal healthcare reflects a lack of a sense of altruism for the lower-income classes (which is starting to include the middle class) among economic right-wingers.
In the nearly unregulated market of the U.S., all who are not wealthy are becoming less so.
Gabriel N. Pelger
Last Head of Executive of the defunct Usian Republic
Goodbye, everyone!
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#74
(6 Jul 2015, 12:52:37)Gabriel N. Pelger Wrote: I agree that education must be improved greatly, with affordable access to higher education and possibly compulsory school attendance (where it is practicable).
The current system of helping people attain higher education has actually proven unfruitful because colleges have raised tuition to ridiculous rates in order to prevent undesirable people from attending; thus having a reverse effect. :(

I suggest starting earlier- and improving the standards of primary schooling, because it used to be "You go to primary school so you can get a job", but now primary ( I mean kindergarten and free school) school does nothing, and a high school dropout can't get an honest job in a mine or on a farm anymore.

(6 Jul 2015, 12:52:37)Gabriel N. Pelger Wrote: As for healthcare and socialized housing being a "bandage" for the U.S. economy, I think that is a rather bad analogy. Your disapproval of establishing universal healthcare reflects a lack of a sense of altruism for the lower-income classes (which is starting to include the middle class) among economic right-wingers.
In the nearly unregulated market of the U.S., all who are not wealthy are becoming less so.
As for the stigma of socialised healthcare- many people say "I can't believe someone wouldn't want to pay for someone else's healthcare, that's just sick"; it's not- it's really clear that I'm not their daddy and don't bring home the bacon to them.

The growing lower class is due to a failing economy. The reason jobs aren't being created is because we're buying houses, buying neighborhoods in floodplains for "federal flood insurance" when you knew the danger of living on a floodplain, buying healthcare, among other such things.

If you lose your job, and someone else starts paying for it; why would you get another job?

And if you lose your job due to job cuts because your company needs to cut some corners, the government raising taxes to supply you with housing and healthcare isn't going to make jobs, if anything it's going to get other people laid off.

I agree with Medicaid: we don't need poor people dying in the streets.
I agree with Medicare: you've worked your whole life and paid in to taxes, it's time you get them back.
I agree with social security checks for seniors, it's time we take care of you for a change, mom.

I don't agree with improving the economy by raising taxes, and many invalids living off of socialised care don't even know where government money comes from, they think it just appears; they don't understand that milk comes from a dairy farm, not from a grocery store.
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Siwa Sopako Wogo Sani-Hong Kunoku
Manu ku awaso yo Tongowa Manuka hehe yoma tise.

If a post doesn't have a question mark, it isn't a question.
If it isn't a question, I'm not asking you anything, I'm telling you.
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