Poll: What is your religion?
Satanist
Atheist
Agnostic
Deist
Non-religious
Spiritual Christian (Non-denominational)
Christian (Catholic)
Christian (Anglican/Episcopalian)
Christian (Protestant)
Christian (Fundamentalist Catholic)
Christian (Fundamentalist Anglican/Protestant)
Christian (Mormon)
Christian (Orthodox)
Christian (Coptic)
Jewish
Muslim
Scientologist
Hindu
Buddhist
Confucian
Other
[Show Results]
 
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Religion
#11
Put myself down as a Protestant. That's that really :D
His Lordship Richard I, by the Grace of God, Lord Spiritual of Mercia, Lord of Clyro, Heir to the Würtige Throne, Lord High Admiral of the Tsardom of Nolland, General of the Nollandish Army, Companion of Honour of the Tsardom of Nolland, Commander of the Order of Colour of McCarthia, Knight of the Sovereign Military Order of Sealand, Member of the Most Honourable Order of the Throne of Sandus, Knight of the Order of Adammia, OGC, CF.
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#12
(17 Jul 2015, 18:49:10)Faustus Sertorius Spago Wrote: Traditionally in China, and probably many other East Asian countries, religion isn't as well defined as they are in the west. Most modern western religions have their own deity/deities to be believed in exclusively, have a set of canon religious texts, etc. In China, there are various philosophies, often accompanied by a set of myths and spiritual beliefs, all mixed in with traditional beliefs.

As for Confucianism, it leans towards the more purely philosophical. Despite this, there are many Confucian shrines, though this could be seen simply as a manifestation of respect for a great elder. Confucianism does though encourage the follower to respect unspecified god/gods/heaven; it does not however define or describe it, believing that not having fully understood the physical world, they could not hope to understand the divine. Probably, this god could be assumed to be the ones of the traditional Chinese religion, or whichever god the Confucian follower worshiped.

I know this (I lived in China for a year, in Confucius' home province, no less :P). Many Chinese people follow an amalgamation of religions (i.e. they may be Buddhists, but still respect traditional Chinese gods). However, I have spoken to several Chinese about this issue (including a learned student of philosophy) and all of them have affirmed that Confucianism is not a religion.

Shrines to deceased great people are common. For example, Mao Zedong is revered and memorialized by many Chinese people, with many photographs and statues seen throughout the country, his books and philosphies common reading, and tens of thousands of visitors to his tomb in Tiananmen Square annually, but he is not considered a god.

Most Chinese with a religion follow Buddhism, Daoism, Chinese folk religion, or a combination thereof. Nearly all of these adherents also hold respect for the teachings of Confucius without revering him as a deity (at least, not more of one than all ancestors are considered to be in Chinese folk religion). You are correct in your deduction that religion is not so strictly defined in Chinese culture: faith is far more fluid, allowing religions to coalesce and complement one another as opposed to conflicting with each other. It was not always like this in Chinese history, but such an arrangement has developed over time.

Not entirely disagreeing with you, just clarifying some of your points ;)
Supporter of memes that don't exist.
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#13
It may be something unexpected from a staunch Catholic like me, but, while I find the lack of a God impossible (atheism) I, in some way, understand those people who call themselves Deist.

Everything that exists in the Universe as physical object or phenomenon is caused by something. What was the cause of the Big Bang? Why did it happen? In Catholic Doctrine, thanks to Thomas Aquinas' "Quinque Viae", whatever caused the beginning of the Universe and the Scientific laws is something of Divine Cause, and it is not physical or mortal, and that being we call God. The reason I understand the Deist point of view is that while this proves God exists, it doesn't really prove it is the God I believe in (the God of Christianity).
PAULUS AEMILIUS I, DUX TREBIAE
Paolo Emilio I, Caudillo of Trebia
DEUS, PATRIA, REX
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#14
(17 Jul 2015, 19:24:17)Sarky Wrote:
(17 Jul 2015, 18:49:10)Faustus Sertorius Spago Wrote: Traditionally in China, and probably many other East Asian countries, religion isn't as well defined as they are in the west. Most modern western religions have their own deity/deities to be believed in exclusively, have a set of canon religious texts, etc. In China, there are various philosophies, often accompanied by a set of myths and spiritual beliefs, all mixed in with traditional beliefs.

As for Confucianism, it leans towards the more purely philosophical. Despite this, there are many Confucian shrines, though this could be seen simply as a manifestation of respect for a great elder. Confucianism does though encourage the follower to respect unspecified god/gods/heaven; it does not however define or describe it, believing that not having fully understood the physical world, they could not hope to understand the divine. Probably, this god could be assumed to be the ones of the traditional Chinese religion, or whichever god the Confucian follower worshiped.

I know this (I lived in China for a year, in Confucius' home province, no less :P). Many Chinese people follow an amalgamation of religions (i.e. they may be Buddhists, but still respect traditional Chinese gods). However, I have spoken to several Chinese about this issue (including a learned student of philosophy) and all of them have affirmed that Confucianism is not a religion.

Shrines to deceased great people are common. For example, Mao Zedong is revered and memorialized by many Chinese people, with many photographs and statues seen throughout the country, his books and philosphies common reading, and tens of thousands of visitors to his tomb in Tiananmen Square annually, but he is not considered a god.

Most Chinese with a religion follow Buddhism, Daoism, Chinese folk religion, or a combination thereof. Nearly all of these adherents also hold respect for the teachings of Confucius without revering him as a deity (at least, not more of one than all ancestors are considered to be in Chinese folk religion). You are correct in your deduction that religion is not so strictly defined in Chinese culture: faith is far more fluid, allowing religions to coalesce and complement one another as opposed to conflicting with each other. It was not always like this in Chinese history, but such an arrangement has developed over time.

Not entirely disagreeing with you, just clarifying some of your points ;)

As someone who is a buddhist and has travelled to China also, I can agree with many of the points here. Chinese culture is almost entirely defined by the trinity of Chinese religions (Confucianism, Buddhism and D(T)aoism). Years of suppression by the authoritarian government has created an interesting dynamic in how the Chinese people view themselves, I'd almost offer the treatment of Chairman Mao as a new religion in China. Political religion (That is, where the government is treated like deities) is rife in that region of Asia - China, North Korea, Vietnam - and despite China's recent opening-up to the rest of the world, some very ancient ideas still penetrate modern society there. I'm interested to see how the Tibet and Uyghuristan issues develop in China, such a society that represses two religious states under it's own rule cannot stay strong forever.



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#15
(17 Jul 2015, 19:24:17)Sarky Wrote: Not entirely disagreeing with you, just clarifying some of your points ;)

Same.
Sincerely,
Spago.

Proud subject of the Aggrawal.
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#16
Made me smile, seeing multiple choice is possible.

I thought we had at least one muslim here? Hope he's ok. (Seperatism may be a risky game in Iran)

As there is no option for the followers of the eternal order of Melchisedek, I may just choose "spiriual christian".

Regards,
His Royal Majesty, King Dieter I.

Veritas Vincit
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#17
The utter lack of Muslims makes me sad. :(
[Image: 9768554.png]
Siwa Sopako Wogo Sani-Hong Kunoku
Manu ku awaso yo Tongowa Manuka hehe yoma tise.

If a post doesn't have a question mark, it isn't a question.
If it isn't a question, I'm not asking you anything, I'm telling you.
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#18
Ach, a Satanist (or a troll) lol
Supporter of memes that don't exist.
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#19
(27 Jul 2015, 22:45:41)Sarky Wrote: Ach, a Satanist (or a troll) lol

Dont worry its a troll!
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#20
(17 Jul 2015, 16:46:08)frix Wrote: How is non-religious separate from agnosticism and atheism in this case? I selected agnostic, but I am therefore non-religious.

Non religious is separate from agnostic because a person can believe in a higher power yet not partake in any specific religion (such as myself) I do believe in God but I don't believe in religion (for reasons I'm not getting into). I'm a Confucian, Confucianism isn't a religion but a way of life. Confucianism is more lax with specific "rules" as opposed to religions. The Communitarian Republic (formerly known as the Definitive Community of Newmerica) has no official state religion due to us allowing our citizens to have the right to freedom of religion.
- His Excellency, The Führer of the Greater Dashist Reich
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